Floods

Recently I finished a book called “Washed Away”. It talks about the Flood of 1913 that affected Dayton, Ohio and Fort Wayne, Indiana, among other places.  The massive rainfall associated with this weather system caused significant amounts of  water to fill the streets made a boat the most effective form of transportation in these areas. Those of us in the Grand Rapids area had a significant flood last year as well. In addition, there was major flooding in Colorado last year as well. The first and  most famous flood is the one recorded in the book of Genesis. God was angry with man’s sin. “And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually” (Genesis 6:5). As a result He decided to wipe out everyone in the world with a flood, except for Noah and his family. After building an ark for 120 years, Noah and his family and the animals God sent him entered the ark and spent the next year and ten days there. During this event water came from both above and beneath the earth. The inside of the earth was likely filled with water at this time. Today it is filled with fire.  This flood, though denied by many today, is still considered to be a benchmark for other floods.  During the flooding that happened in Colorado last year, I saw a headline in USA Today that read “Flood of Biblical Proportions”.  After the Genesis flood God promised never to send a flood of waters upon the earth to destroy all mankind.  Why then do we still get floods today? God did not promise that rivers would never again overflow,  or that hurricanes or fast-moving thunderstorms would not drop vast amounts of rain on the earth. Rather He promised that He would never send a flood that would kill most of world’s inhabitants and destroy the whole creation. We do well to remember that God has control over the flood waters that come upon the earth, but those aren’t the only floods He controls. We experience floods of emotions as the result of the experiences that we have, and sometimes we almost drown in them. These afflictions might be the death of a friend or family member, cancer, job loss, the breakup with one’s boyfriend or girlfriend, or anything else we view as evil.  We also experience floods of guilt over our sins. During these troubling times God has promised that “When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee” (Isaiah 43:2). With God’s help, these floods won’t overwhelm us and drag us down. Let us remember that God is faithful, and He brings us through the experiences of this life into heavenly glory.

Kevin Rau

Noah

Hollywood produces many films in a variety of genres and subject areas: comedies, dramas, thrillers, cop films, movies depicting historical events, and many others as well. One area that directors sometimes tackle is Biblical films. The most famous of these is Passion of the Christ by Mel Gibson. The problem with these films as in many other movies is the lack of concern for accuracy and sticking to a storyline throughout the film. Such is the case with the latest film about Noah. The characters aren’t represented accurately and are changed to reflect an environmentalist agenda. Noah is a good man who is an herbivore. The evil men are meat eaters who want destroy Noah and his family as well as his flocks and herds from off the face of the earth. God, according to this film, is angry with these meat eaters and sends a flood to destroy them, while Noah and his family wait it out in the ark. The actual story of course, concerns an earth that had grown great with wickedness and “was filled with violence” (Genesis 6:11). The evil is so great that God becomes angry with man for disobeying His laws and following in their own ways. But in contrast to these men, “Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord” (Genesis 6:8). At this point God commanded him to preach to the people for 120 years about a worldwide flood that would come about partly as the result of a massive amount rain. As we have previously seen, this type of precipitation did not occur before the flood. After the year and ten days that Noah and his family spent in the ark, the flood waters receded enough so that they were able to leave the ark on Mount Ararat and start lives in the brand new world that God had made for them. This story is ignored by filmmakers bent on an agenda and a knack for never letting the facts get in the way of a good story. This movie also has elements of the Kaballah cult in it. This group believes in magic and mysticism and has no place in biblical belief. The problem with the environmentalist slant to the movie is that it condemns those who wish to use God’s creation by mining minerals, hunting animals, chopping down trees to build houses, and any other use of the creation that they don’t approve of. As Christians we may wisely and thankfully use the resources God has placed on this earth for our benefit. “For every creature of God is good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving” (1 Timothy 4:4). The second problem with the environmentalist agenda is that it promotes a worship of nature. God condemns those “Who changed the truth of God into a lie, and worshipped and served the creature more than the Creator, who is blessed forever. Amen” (Romans 1:25). Should we as young people and young adults spend our money seeing such a production? I don’t think it’s a good idea to see this movie because it treats the word of God the way man wants it to be dealt with. Furthermore, an actor plays God and that is blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. Because no one can see God, Hollywood also has only a vague, earthly conception of who He is and therefore does not accurately represent Him. “No man hath seen God at any time”(1 John 4:12). This was also the case in Passion of the Christ. In light of this, we should be skeptical of Hollywood’s treatment the Bible and its themes and characters. When we have a proper respect and reverence for God’s word, then we can be assured of being greatly edified and blessed by it, as we seek to live according to it by His grace and Holy Spirit.

Kevin Rau